A Whole Lot of Research

The ideas and practices outlined in the BELIEVE IT. BUILD IT. guide are solidly based on some of the most important research currently guiding the field of afterschool.  These sources include:

  • Birmingham, J., Pechman, E. M., Russell, C. A., & Mielke, M. (2005). Shared features of high-performing after-school programs: A follow-up to the TASC evaluation. Policy Studies Associates.
  • Bodilly, S. J. & Beckett, M. (2005). Making Out of School Time Matter: Evidence for Action Agenda (Vol. 9108). RAND Media.
  • Durlak, J. & Weissberg, R. (2007). The impact of after-school programs that promote personal and social skills. Chicago, IL: Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning.
  • Eccles, J. S., Early, D., Fraser, K., Belansky, E., & McCarthy, K. (1997). The relation of connection, regulation, and support for autonomy to adolescents’ functioning. Journal of Adolescent Research, 12(2), 263-286.
  • Gambone, M.A., Klem, A.M. & Connell, J.P. (2002). Finding Out What Matters for Youth: Testing Key Links in a Community Action Framework for Youth Development. Philadelphia: Youth Development Strategies, Inc ., and Institute for Research and Reform in Education.
  • Halpern, R. (2006). Confronting “The Big Lie”: The need to reframe expectations of afterschool programs. Partnership for After School Education.
  • Huang, D., et al. (2008). Identification of key indicators of quality in afterschool programs. CRESST Report 748. University of California, Los Angeles.
  • Kennedy, E., Bronte-Tinkew, J., and Matthews, G. (2007). Enhancing cultural competence in out-of-school time programs: What is it, and why is it important? Research-to-Results Child Trends Publication #2007-03.
  • Little, P., Wimer, C., & Weiss, H. (2007). After School Programs in the 21st Century: Their Potential and What It Takes to Achieve It. Harvard Family Research Project. Cambridge, MA.
  • Miller, B. (2005). Pathways to Success for Youth: What Counts in Afterschool. MARS Report. United Way of Massachusetts Bay.
  • National Research Council. (2002). Community Programs to promote youth development. The National Academies Press.
  • Olsen, L., Bhattacharya, J., & Sharf, A. (2007). Cultural competency: what it is and why it matters. California Tomorrow.
  • Smith, et al. (2012). Continuous quality improvement in afterschool settings: Impact findings from the Youth Program Quality Intervention study. Washington, DC: Forum for Youth Investment.
  • Vandell, D., Reisner, E. R., & Pierce, K. M. (2007). Outcomes linked to high-quality afterschool programs: Longitudinal findings from the study of promising afterschool programs. Policy Study Associates.
  • Walker, J., Gran, C., & Moore, D. (2009). Once We Know It, We Can Grow It: A Framework for Quality Nonformal Learning Opportunities and Youth Work Practice. University of Minnesota Extension, Youth Development.
  • Williams, B. (2001). Accomplishing cross cultural competence in youth development programs. Journal of Extension, 39 (6).

And inspiration from our peers

The ideas in the BELIEVE IT. BUILD IT. guide were inspired by the work of other statewide afterschool networks and program providers that have gone before us in creating a shared set of beliefs and best practices for their stakeholders.  We are grateful for the inspiration that we found in the following guidebooks:

  • A Field Guide to Best Practices and Indicators for Out-of-School Time Programs in the District of Columbia
  • Georgia Afterschool Quality Standards
  • Minnesota School Age Core Competencies First Edition, February 2006
  • Quality Guidelines for Ohio's Afterschool Programs
  • Quality Standards for Afterschool and Youth Development Programs: Washington State
  • Utah Afterschool Quality Standards
  • YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities Youth Programs Quality Infrastructure Tool

 

A Great Big Thanks

The BELIEVE IT. BUILD IT. guide is the culmination of many individuals who came together to share their deep knowledge and profound experiences in youth work. The Design and Concept Team informed the guide’s preliminary content and structure, then Ignite Afterschool network partners convened 13 Regional Input Sessions to involve the afterschool community from all corners of the state in shaping the final guide. We are grateful to these individuals and organizations for generously contributing their wisdom, their time, and their passion to help afterschool providers best serve Minnesota’s young people.  We gratefully acknowledge:

Design and Concept Team:

  • Amy Skare, Stillwater Area Public Schools Community Education
  • Brandi Olson, Brandi Olson Consulting
  • Cheryl Meld, McGregor Area School District (ISD 4)
  • Chue Xiong, YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities
  • Deborah Moore, University of Minnesota Youth Work Learning Lab
  • Deneene Graham, United Way of Olmsted County
  • Eric Billiet, Minnesota Department of Education
  • Erik Skold, Sprockets
  • Fatima Muhammad, Minneapolis Youth Coordinating Board
  • Hayley Tompkins, Minneapolis Beacons Network
  • Heidi Pope, Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board
  • Ian Graue, PACT for Families Collaborative
  • Jaci David, Blandin Foundation
  • Jocelyn Wiedow, Sprockets
  • Kate Walker, University of Minnesota Extension Center for Youth Development
  • Liana Tessum, Girl Scouts River Valleys
  • Maureen Hartman, Hennepin County Library
  • Nou Yang, Amherst H. Wilder Foundation
  • Pam McBride, Minneapolis Youth Coordinating Board
  • Rachel Oberg-Hauser, Greater Twin Cities United Way
  • Sheila Oehrlein, Minnesota Department of Education
  • Therese Genis, YWCA of Minneapolis
  • Tracie Clanaugh, Duluth Area Family YMCA

Regional Input Session Conveners:

  • Brooklyn Bridge Alliance for Youth
  • Eastern Carver County Schools (ISD 112) Community Education
  • Greater Twin Cities United Way
  • Itasca Networks for Youth
  • Minneapolis Youth Coordinating Board
  • Minnesota Association for the Education of Young Children and the Minnesota School-Age Care Alliance (MnAEYC-MnSACA)
  • Northland Foundation
  • PACT for Families Collaborative
  • Rochester Area Youth Programs Network
  • Sprockets
  • University of Minnesota Extension Center for Youth Development – Moorhead Regional Office

Ignite Afterschool’s Professional Development and Quality Committee Members:

  • Brandi Olson, Brandi Olson Consulting
  • Deborah Moore, University of Minnesota Youth Work Learning Lab
  • Eric Billiet, Minnesota Department of Education
  • Hayley Tompkins, Minneapolis Beacons Network
  • Heidi Pope, Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board
  • Jocelyn Wiedow, Sprockets
  • Kate Walker, University of Minnesota Extension Center for Youth Development
  • Kathleen O’Donnell, Minnesota Association for the Education of Young Children and the Minnesota School-Age Care Alliance (MnAEYC-MnSACA)
  • Mandy Wroolie, Minnesota Youth Intervention Programs Association
  • Pam McBride, Minneapolis Youth Coordinating Board
  • Sara Benzkofer, Minnesota Association for the Education of Young Children and the Minnesota School-Age Care Alliance ((MnAEYC-MnSACA)

Consultants:

  • Andrea Jasken Baker, AJB Consulting
  • Erin Gibbons, Launch Lab Creative
  • Janine Hanson, Janine Hanson Communications, LLC

Funders:

We would also like to thank the following organizations for providing generous financial support that made this guide possible:

  • 21st Century Community Learning Centers, Minnesota Department of Education (rearranged order)
  • Charles Stewart Mott Foundation
  • Greater Twin Cities United Way
  • Youthprise

We are especially grateful to Youthprise, Ignite Afterschool’s fiscal sponsor.